Our Communication, Not Always Clear.

Trotting November

I tell her to soften, stay forward, bend just a bit around the inside leg.

She hears something completely different:

-” Yes!  I should emulate a stick!  That’s what she wants.  And that inside leg?  That must meant to push my barrel against it.  Oh, and perhaps slow down…”

 

Offering up a photo bomb today.  Just because I can.  We are having fun – hope you are too!

Elinor Yee

November

Valiosa November

24 thoughts on “Our Communication, Not Always Clear.

  1. LOL. I always love the headless horseman shots. It happens to me daily. That’s when you crop the shot into a closeup and say, “art shot!” I envy your surroundings as I sit here looking out at an inch of snow on the ground. :-/

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    1. Haha. I don’t have as professional photographers as you 😉 One day I hope you’ll do a post on how to do good shots in a covered arena with bright light outside… Sigh. I know for sure I would read it!…

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      1. LOL, Don’t! Shoot at night with a good flash unit. But if you do shoot during the day, you have to balance the indoor light with outside, so again, flash big time! And stop riding along the edge. Ride down the middle and have your photographer with their back to the windows. Then they can use the sunlight like a flash. There, mini lesson. 🙂

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        1. Therein lies the problem. There are no windows – it’s open all around the entire perimeter, with bright light coming in all around (this is California after all. The sun won’t leave. I’m living voraciously for getting good pictures November through January only).
          If I can drag husband out again, perhaps January, he can try with flash as you reccomend. The problem is that the riding itself is so dorky, we have to burst and take 2000 pictures to get 10 decent ones 😉
          Of course bursting doesn’t work with the flash. But then again, not keeping it together for 30 seconds, that’s entirely my own problem LOL!

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          1. LOL! I know you don’t have windows. I should have said “openings”. But if you have the “opening at your back and ride down the middle, the light from the other side will be weaker. Especially morning and afternoon, when the sun is predominantly on one side or the other.
            To remove “Dorky” get your husband to go down on his knees. (Stop snickering). You should always shoot up at a horse. It makes the steps look higher and it covers up a lot.
            Of course, there is one final solution that will get you hundreds of shots that you will cherish for the rest of your life. Send me a ticket and feed me for a few days and I’ll do the shots! “Honestly, if you want to do something right, you have to do it yourself” OHH did I write that out loud!? 😉

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          2. 🙂 This is great!
            Nah, I think I’ll rather have you dole out advice here and guide us for free and give out ALL your secrets as we fumble with this LOL.
            Seriously, I haven’t thought of having any ridden pictures taken more from a lower perspective. I’ve done it before for sales pictures, just standing straight up, for conformation shots, and it works really well.
            That’s a great point!

            My “real” photographer is my son. He comes out slightly more often than my husbands’ twice annual celebrity visits (read, dragged out and bribed) to shoot with the camera during school breaks. He’s getting better as his wrists are getting stronger to hold the darn thing 😉
            He’ll have a whole new set of instructions for Christmas break! 🙂

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          3. LOL. I didn’t really want to go to your place anyway. Too hot.We already have snow on the ground and I’m preparing for snow shoots. If you look at my dressage shots, most of them, I’m sitting on a camp stool it puts my camera at just below the chest of the horse. However this now gives emphasis to the horse’s legs and timing becomes crucial. The goal is to always get the outside leg in a forward position or at least one of the legs extended. Here is a link to a show I did a couple of months ago. I was sitting for 90% of the shots. Let me know what you think. 🙂
            http://www.tomvonkapherrphotography.com/Dressage-Championships-The-Fal

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          4. Oh I must check this out!
            Last time I tried to follow your link to a Facebook page it didn’t work out for my phone. I’ll have to use the desk top, sigh.

            I also saw your chicken show post! ! Haven’t even had time to click it just yet. Horses to chickens is quite a stretch. Then again, they both move fast, ALL the time!

            By the way, I think you’d really like it here in December, fairly dry, and no breath killing heat… ( I usually swear to move at the end stretch of each summer. ..)

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          5. The link is not to Facebook. It’s to my photo gallery so should work easily. I’ve actually been to Cal-a-forn-i-A quite a number of times over the years for work. But now that you mention it, never at this time of year! I’ll have to check it out some time.
            The chickens are just barn shots. nothing spectacular. More silly then anything else. 😉

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          6. Went back again to look at the galleries. Really, you just can’t beat that backdrop, lovely! I definitely see what you mean with shooting from a lowered perspective. Will try this if we get a chance at the end of december.
            The gallery from September was really nice, I would imagine this is the perfect setup – outdoors, so there is abundant light, yet NO glaring sun which limits the angles from which you can shoot.
            Love it! We rarely get that here, as I don’t see too many days with cloud protection.

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          7. Hmm, this is very tecnichal. I mostly see it as something heavy, expensive, and fragile.
            I’ll have to ask 🙂
            No tulips sprouting yet, just the occasional fly spot.
            (I just HAD to say that. What the heck is a tulip haha!)

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          8. LMAO. Great answer! The only thing missing was, “It’s black”. A “tulip” is a cone that fits on the end of the camera lens. It acts like the brim of a baseball hat and keeps light from going directly into the lens. It kind of looks like a tulip. If you don’t have one it’s well worth the $5.00 to help balance the direct sunlight light. (“FLY spot” HAHAHA )

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          9. OK he says it’s a Nikon D200. And supposedly there IS a Tulip on there. I have to say that’s the most colorless one I’ve ever seen 😉
            The lenses are F2.8 lense.
            Fair enough set up, but it’s all in the hands of the photographer, and the ones I have are lovely but not exactly educated 🙂
            (And then lets not forget it helps if the rider/horse know what they’re doing.)

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          10. LOL, OK, do you know the mm on the lens? It will say 18 – 55mm or 18 – 105mm. This is the zoom on the camera lens. It will help if you have something like a 70- 200mm lens. This will show your mistakes, close up and very sharp 😉
            When was the camera last “reset”?
            Resetting to original settings is great for when you start playing around and can’t get back to the original settings. The D200 is a very good camera (many professionals still use it to this day) It’s factory settings help the automatic sensors to pretty much give you great shots every time. But it is a bit more complicated then a point and shoot camera. I’ll see if I can make you a quick settings list to help your photographer.
            It’s almost worth putting the D200 away and getting a D3200 package with a 50-200mm 4.5, off of Amazon for a few hundred bucks. Set it to multi frame, “running” mode and Jpeg-fine and away you go.
            I have 2, 3200’s for my cat shots around the house and in the yard for quick shooting. Here’s a link to give you an idea. The movement shots are great. http://www.tomvonkapherrphotography.com/Cats-at-the-Bar

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          11. Hubby says it is a 17-55. Then he also has another larger zoom that is way to heavy for son to hold.
            After additional questions he soured completely, grumbled somthing about me being way above my head, and that I’m riding too fast anyway, and that it’s all silly circles and just stop trying to fiddle with his camera.
            Oh.
            I’ll have to start working on my son instead 😉
            Now I’m off to check out some cat pictures!

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          12. LMAO! If it’s “HIS” camera then it’s definetely time to get your son the 3200 for Xmas. What I like about it, it’s very light weight. Even with a 55-200 lens, it will weigh less then the D210. The 210 is old technology and a very heavy camera, compared to the ones made now. The 17-55 lens is a portrait, wide angle lens. Your son should be proud that he gets as good shots of you as he does, with that lens. 😉

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