foggy morning
Horses, Every Day

Surprise, Your Horse Can’t Be Ridden By Anyone Else!

Aren’t you happy!?

Didn’t think so.  Who wants to find out their young horse somehow understands the aids you give, but won’t budge when someone new rides her!  Sigh.

A break in the routine, with extended family visit, left us with a confused, non cooperative mare.  We never really got warmed up.

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She wasn’t excited with me either once back in the saddle, bracey and unhappy to experiment any more at all.

The superstar 13-year-old got her self a nice bareback ride on sweet Misty instead.  She always delivers.

The rest of this week – working on basic cooperation.  Hoping for a couple of more magic fog mornings to ride in before winter is over!

Foggy Morning

 

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11 thoughts on “Surprise, Your Horse Can’t Be Ridden By Anyone Else!

    • I felt really at loss, when she was like a completely different horse yesterday. Just WAY too smart – she figured out she could get away with not doing much of anything with two riders for a few minutes each on Friday, and that was enough to pull out the same behavior with me. Astonishing.
      Hoping to build up the right trust, a sense of fun, and get my girl back ASAP.

      This BETTER pay off in the future when she will have to pick up quickly, on other things… 😉

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      • She’s about five, right? I have heard from friends that many horses go through an “interesting” (read: difficult/adolescent) stage at age five. I don’t remember having that with my horses so much, but it could be breed dependent. Anyway, I do think that mares can be very particular about their person and she could have been a little ticked that you let someone else ride her. Seriously. They are sensitive, and while they may accept another rider, it has to be carefully (tactfully) done.
        This intelligence of hers will DEFINITELY pay off in the future with a fun to train horse who learns quickly (just be sure you are teaching her the right things – ha ha).

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        • Yep, officially 5, but she was a late summer foal, so in my own book she’s really just a four year old still for several more months.
          But, of course you’re right, she’s in the testing phase now.
          What took me by surprise was that she picked up on the trick of “no go” so quickly, from just that one day.

          This morning’s ride was much better, with no sour stops or tricks, and I just did many simple walk trot transitions, no suppling work at all, just basic forward and back to walk.
          Mares, sigh 😉

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  1. I bought my mare from one of the trainers at our barn, who had had her since she was only a few months old. She was 14 when I bought her. Two years later, I asked her former owner to ride her for me while I was gone for a few days. My trainer (who also coaches this trainer) had to school her on how to ride her former horse since we had added so many buttons to her in those two years!

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    • This is exactly what I need to hear. I thought it was really mostly due to her being so young, but evidently not. Thank you Alli – helps to know! Bet the trainer felt less enthusiastic though 🙂

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  2. It’s hard to go back to work after an extended vacation! I had a horse with a poor work ethic, who needed to be reintroduced to work tactfully after every break. You’re smart to try having other people ride her, even if it’s for a short hack — so she learns to adapt to different styles of riding. Best of luck!

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  3. A friend of mine and a very good rider who regularly jumps 1.10 sat on Abbey 6 weeks ago. It was really interesting watching her work out how to ride her. My friend has to really hold her horse back but Abbey hated the lack of freedom, as soon as she ‘let her go’ a little, Abbey jumped so much better. Likewise her horse takes her into fences whereas Abbey still needs reassurance with your leg so the first couple of fences were a little wobbly. I’ve another friend who’s going to do some flatwork with her in a couple of weeks – it’ll be a fascinating evening, she’s much more a gelding-type person!

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    • It’s the first time for me where a horse just flat out refuses to work at all with a new rider 🙂
      Your Abbey sounds like a little gem – great that you can have some friends try her here and there for something new!

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