staying motivated with your horse
Dressage On A Dime Tips

Training On Your Own

Not easy, is it?

Staying motivated, focused, and sure that the green riding project is going in the right direction is not at all just about showing up and “doing the best you can.”

I have found I have to do even better than that.  Challenge myself to become a better rider, little by little, to make her – a better horse.

just another ride

A Dressage On A Dime tip, a completely free one, is to have a blog!

Clicked on the stats recently and saw that A Horse For Elinor has gone long past 35,000 hits.  All thanks to you!!

training alone

Writing about the progress, or eh, sometimes lack of it, is truly helpful.  It also helps to look back at where we were a month ago, or a year ago.

Can’t thank you enough for checking in on us!  The support, no matter how small – just the fact you poked in, is truly motivating.

Who would have thought there’d be so much interest in just another backyard rider poking around?

My horse and the dogs

That’s all from me today.

 

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9 thoughts on “Training On Your Own

  1. It’s been a while since I’ve been reading the posts, but happy to be back again :)! I think you two are an amazingly beautiful combination <3. I love reading about you two and I enjoy the pictures! Keep on writing, Merel

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  2. I’ve been riding dressage for about 8 years now, and I never would have reached the point I’m at (which is still far from expert or even above average) without the help of my trainer of the last 5 years. I can’t even imagine trying to do this on my own. I am finally arriving at a place where I can feel how my body affects the horse and make the proper decision with the proper timing. It’s taken years of explanations and nit-picking my position and timing to get there. Just in the last few months has the sitting trot finally begun to feel somewhat comfortable and natural. I’m not a “natural” rider, so every little thing has to be carefully studied and practiced to be learned. I started out in the hunter world 18 years ago, but never began to feel truly at one with the horse until dressage. So you are a hero in my book, forging on with the resources you have!

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    • Dressage is an addiction, isn’t it 🙂 Not sure if I’m much of a hero, but if I’m part of inspiring anyone, no matter how little, I’m ALL FOR IT!
      I think there are many riders out there, chugging along, trying to gain just a few more skills each year on their own.
      Most though, don’t chose to post about it all over the Internet, admitting how little they know, or how slowly they progress – most of us don’t even want to know haha 🙂
      If I can be an inspiration to other adult amateurs, with or without a “support system” behind them – I think that’s super cool! I think the sport needs SO many more of us, to continue to grow, and to be attractive to more riders.
      Now – more horsey pictures on your website Alli 🙂

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      • Summer shows are coming up. If I can round up a photographer, or better yet a videographer, there should be some horsey pictures in early June.

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        • Yey! Exciting! Sometimes, all you need is someone that can snap a few pictures from the sidelines with the cell phone. (Not always easy to find someone at a dressage show – I know all about that!)

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  3. So hard! We’re kind of on our own at our new barn and I’m already getting a little squirrely. I worry that I don’t have a sound enough foundation to do it on my own. I have no doubt that I can maintain our level (hopefully avoiding forming bad habits) but I don’t think I can progress without help.

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    • You’ve got that right – it’s pretty much impossible to progress without help. However, I DO think it’s possible to maintain, as long as we’re constantly looking for other ways to improve and grow.

      It can be going to clinics to audit, watch online training and teaching (even small tidbits can help to bring home to our own rides the next day.), reading articles and reading about other riders’ training, going to shows and watching both tests and warmups, volunteering for any and all events that we can to snap up some knowledge, or simply sitting in on some one elses lesson, paying attention the whole time.

      A snapped picture here can help with riding position, better yet – some video, although that’s very hard to come by, at least for me…

      Find an instructor who will come out, however infrequent as the budget allows, and just stick with it. It’s a hobby – and it should be fun! Enjoy your new barn!! 🙂

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