Do You Have A Manure Grill?

Valiosa has settled in at the new farm really well.

With less pain in the hand and my horse more confident in her surroundings, I’ve been able to work her on the lunge just fine a few times now.  Yay!

Impossible to do it just right, (Try lunging with the whip in your armpit…) but great for maintaining fitness and some muscle conditioning.

She adores her pasture mates.  Maybe too much…  She’s had some riding from Alexis, but during the last ride she was absolutely impossible.  Screaming for them the entire time, inattentive and impossibly naughty.

Between ugly mule and tense giraffe, this is all we got.

fressage horse

insecure horse
It was rainy, her friends were eating, she wanted her amateur rider back and walk on a long rein.  And be angry.

horse reluctant in walk
My steed, as the most unpleasurable ride of the day.
horse screaming in arena

So, no, things are not super easy and friction free.  Are they ever? 🙂


Then, this here mysterious washrack lurker kept asking about the Manure Grill.

wash rack lurker

How does the manure grill work?  How do you turn it on?  How often do they really use it?

The manure grill?

We walked out in the rain to see it.

stallion breeding mount

28 thoughts on “Do You Have A Manure Grill?

  1. HAHA – we actually DO have one of those at the ranch. The ranch owner has a breeding stallion who is now retired. When we first moved here, both of my horses gave it a long look. I am not sure if they were imagining grill marks or GIRL marks. :0)

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    1. LOL!! Jan, it’s a dummy that stallions can mount for breeders to safely collect semen for artificial insemination. We could have a whole discussion on the hows, whys, and wherefores but I’ll leave it at that here!

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  2. She misses her Miss E, who lets her do anything she wants. Besides, eating inside is much more appealing than being ridden in a drafty, open practice ring. 🙂

    Did you receive part 3 of the riding clinic on paper from Deborah? It’s all about getting yourself in proper frame of mind during and after rehab, and in particular rebuilding your hand strength and dexterity – preferably developing a very firm handshake. She wanted you to have an easy part before increasing the difficulty level.

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    1. My brat mare 🙂

      Yes, got Deborah’s message! This might prove a whole lot more difficult than it sounds, just from reading it. My left hand is but a shadow of itself. I’ll fill in with feedback later, buckling down for 3 days without horsing right now, ugh 🙂

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  3. Poor girl being forced for work while her friends were allowed to hang out! Whatever you do- don’t let her get a cell phone or she will be on it texting all the time and complaining how you are RUINING HER LIFE. 😀

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  4. Well, doesn’t it make you feel just the teensiest bit better that even the professional trainer had difficulties with her? Now of course you want your princess to be great for the trainer, but there is a little reassurance in the fact that it’s not ALWAYS entirely ALL your fault. Rest assured, Valiosa will figure out how to separate from her pasture mates and focus on some work. It will be a very good lesson for her (!). Nice that someone else gets to teach it to her, too.

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    1. Yes. No! Or yes. I mean no…
      I really wanted her to magically transform, straighten, and then carry that on with her once I started riding again 🙂 (Yeah, dream on.) Instead the twiddled along and behaved like she had barely a few weeks of training under her belt. Ugh! Horses!! You can never figure them out!
      I’m lucky Alexis even want to get back on her again 😉
      Wondering how the few weeks of tune up riding help up with Star? I know from experience it can be REALLY hard to keep that same feeling.

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      1. Big Sigh. I managed to undo the 4 weeks of tuneup in, oh, probably 2 days. On the other hand, now my trainer has a much better understanding of Star and what I deal with (strengths and weaknesses) when I ride her. She says she is just like her daddy (Faralay II), which is mostly good but has its challenges. I think you will gain more by watching what Alexis does and then trying to repeat that when you get back on. I didn’t get to watch more than one trainer ride…so it was oh so easy to just go back to my old co-dependent ways with Star.

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        1. 2nd sentence there – YES! I think it makes a WORLD of a difference when they’ve ridden them and actually gotten the feel of all the weird stuff. It’s very helpful.
          One of the things Valiosa does is she pushes against the leg, making an impenetrable wall, and your aid now means nothing. I’ve had this feeling for so long when riding her, and it’s not visible from the ground. It was SO validating to hear another rider say it.
          Of course hoping there will be some more saddle time where that can be addressed.
          Maybe in a lesson you can arrange for half trainer ride half you? And get a little time to watch what’s going on. Not always easy to pull that off, I know!

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          1. Yes, we’ve talked about doing that and will do it some time soon. I only do one lesson a week and sometimes that doesn’t even happen because of big wind/rain storms lately. Weather is getting better, though! By the way – riding without stirrups a couple of days ago gave amazing results re: stiff side/no bending problems. I may write an article on this but have to try it again and also get someone to take pictures. It was fascinating how much better she was. Obviously…how much better “I” was without stirrups. Poor Star, clearly I block her sometimes.

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          2. It’s been a pretty interesting winter 😉
            How interesting with the no stirrups and bending. I’m sure it comes from up in the hips, with the no stirrups I’m able to sink deeper into the saddle, let go of the pinching, and then steer from my seat. Well, I have no idea how to transfer this to work WITH stirrups 🙂
            Oh, and then I get sore the next day!

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          3. Yep. I believe it is the hips and seat bones. I could better align my seat bones without the stirrups. Of course I tend to be a bit crooked (age, back problems, etc.), but I also think the saddle being a little out of balance is exacerbating this right now – hence dropping the stirrups allowed me to drop my leg and realign everything. Star is very sensitive (I think that’s true of the breed – and of course many horses in general).

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          4. But yes, they DO tend to be much more sensitive, agree with that.
            Honestly, sometimes I get absolutely discouraged with the whole thing. And yes, frustrated, because really, how much DO I want to sit around and think about seatbones, hips, and lowerleg aids. Sigh. Then, a good ride, or a hint towards it erases all of that 🙂

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          5. Agreed! Sometimes you just need to go on a trail ride and be a girl and her horse, right? You really are good enough to do this thing, you know. My motto: Perfection is the enemy of the good. Remember that. It’s worth living by. Perfection will suck the life out of you, and yet we dressage riders are consumed by it. Celebrate small victories.

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          6. Yeah.
            Despite not riding for soon 2 months, it really hasn’t been super challenging, since I get so much out of actually just spending time with my horse. Heading out with her for trail walks has been pretty cool actually. And we’ve worked on small stuff, like actually obeying the ‘hoof up’ voice command. Little victories 🙂
            I need you here Edie!

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          7. Not screaming is a huge improvement! Especially with how closely bonded she is with that mare friend. Maybe Valiosa is growing up, getting the picture of how things work here? Maybe?

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  5. She has bonded to her herd! Pretty normal ÷tuff for a mare. I could tell you some hilarious stories about when my daughter and I had mares and the problems we had at shows riding at the same time in different arenas. It wasn’t so funny then with all the screaming and squirreling going one but it’s funny now! Hope you’ll be mended completely soon.

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    1. The beautiful Friesian I rode and showed was absolutely nuts with showing if she’d trailered in with another friend. So exhaustive 😉
      I never thought I’d have this issue with Valiosa. Sigh 🙂
      Interestingly, he worked her on my own from the ground now 3 times in a row, NO problem – wondering if the issue is solved… or if it’s only under Saddle now… gahhhha! I’ll be back with reports later 😉

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