10 More Lessons I’ve Learned From Horse Blogging

Carrying on with the next 10 tips today.

As promised yesterday, here’s the rest from the original list.


10 more horse blogging tips for a reader friendly blog!

Dressage On A Dime A Horse For Elinor

Before we get in to it – remember to have fun with your blog! There’s really no true rules. As always, I’d love to hear what you have to say at the end! Share your own tips and pet peeves!

11. Consider the content in any picture before posting.

Readers will have a hard time seeing a quick image as something fleeting or temporary, or as something unusual.

If you choose to post pictures of your horse, let’s say lathered and with a rope halter rubbing off its outside eye on the lunge line, then yes, viewers will see this as a true representation of how your horses are normally handled.

Even if it was just one time. For 5 minutes.

Just that it was published on your blog draws a parallel, and sets a precedence.

Getting off track here… As you can tell below, I check every picture before posting to make sure everything is correct and in place. Right…

candid picture gone wrong

12. Ignore the statistics for now.

Hits of 2000 per month is insignificant, and won’t pull in any money. Just write anyway, have fun with it, and think of the reasons the blog started in the first place!

A way to document? An adventure? A chance to create a network of like-minded that could never happen in real life… Because we’re always too busy waiting for the farrier. Or run out of time cleaning tack, or fixing the broken hay net, again.

13. Spell check.

‘Nuff said. No grammar police, but a spell check is nice. I butcher sentences in my own special way and reverse the words to where the syntax is broken. More or less on purpose perhaps.

But a spell check is easy, and readers really do like it.

The easy part is pushing the square with ABC and a check mark, every time. Yes?

Benefits of hand Walking Young horses on trails

14. Imaging is king. (That’s not even a sentence, I’m lost.)

See 11 above – pictures mean a lot. Include a photo in every post.

We know content is king, but the eye is a cheat and an easy sell and will stay longer on a page with a picture.

Posts with no images get very little views. It’s simply how it works. You can read all sorts of marketing studies on this. Or just go with it – and break up those chunks of text.

Honorable mention:

Try really hard to use only your own images for at least 90% of all pictures on the blog. It makes a difference – the material should always feel as if it comes from you.

Hand walking green horse on trail

15. Page Backgrounds. Just. Don’t. Do it.

It should be illegal for themes with purple and pink paisley to even exist as an option.

No one does this any more. Right?!

16. Once-weekly posting may be enough.

Supposedly webcrawlers look for fresh content and it will help in search ratings if the website has been updated. If your site has new content, it will pop up higher/earlier in search engines. That’s all.

Excessive posting doesn’t really do anything. This blog is published more often, just because I like it… More posts doesn’t always equal more reader-worthy posts.

Cantering green horse

17. Answer comments on the blog. At some point.

I’m always incredibly grateful for reader comments. It’s fun, I love to interact, hear what others are doing and find out what they think about the post!

But there’s not law that says a writer has to be a slave to commenting right away. Many of us have an incredible long list of things that has to happen every day. (We’re horse people!) Taking time to write is huge.

Every one will understand if comments are unanswered for a couple of days. The less stress around anything with your writing, the more fun!

18. Quit it with the pop ups.

Unless it’s a cheesy self-help site. Or a scam. Or a virus. It feels a bit like click-bait…

Most of us are snake-fast with the “Back” button!

19. Focus on “Ease Of Use” for your readers.

The blog should be easy to read, access, and navigate! There are blogs where readers have to “click for more” to be able to read the entire post. Really? Come on! Many won’t click…

Don’t sacrifice ease of use just to get more page clicks and increased statistics on a page that doesn’t bring in any money in the first place. More “views” don’t make a difference in the larger scheme of things.

Readers will stay longer instead if the full post can be read upfront, and why not allow several, earlier, posts below it?

Maybe infinite scrolling of 5-10 posts? Sure, statistics will show more views if readers are forced to “click-through” to see each individual post.

But why??! I’d love to hear your feedback on this. Hit me!

cantering green horse and half halt

20. Reviews, and how they may, or may not generate more followers.

Write reviews because they’re fun and because you enjoy writing them. My posts with the largest statistics and the longest shelf life are all reviews. (Aside from a post with a tag Mount A Horse which keeps getting high hits, Germany every time. So wrong.)

The same goes for some shared posts and certain content found through Online Searches – they generate hits, but not necessarily new Followers.

Many come for the content, read, and move on. A view from Pinterest means just that – a view.

Just what everyone does when getting information, right? We don’t always take time to click-through past the article to find out who wrote it, what else is going on this site, and decide to Follow, Share, Like, Pin, or Forward it.

This doesn’t really change anything in the actual writing of the blog. Just more something to keep in mind – a blog can sit with lower followers and still have a huge reach.

Enjoyed the tips? Help your friends out, share your thoughts!

Dressage On A Dime A Horse For Elinor

20 Tips To Rock Your Horse Blog!

Hey, this is really cool – I’ve had readers coming to me asking for “How To” tips.

This is not an expert site in any way.  But thing is, I’ve already got a list posted at the ready! If you’ve missed it, let’s get in to it right away.  Below is the first 10.5 tips.  Add your own at the bottom!  We need it – I’m not an expert or anything.


10 and 1/2 quick tips on how to make blog posts that readers will take the time to read.

There’s fantastic content out there, in all those blogs, some is really well worth a read!

But much of it doesn’t actually.  You know.  Get read.

Dressage On A Dime A Horse For Elinor

None of us are expert blog marketing gurus.  Let’s face it – we’d rather be in the saddle than reading up on mysterious ways to increase readership traffic on our little side-kick horse blogs.

Since we’re all in this together – today is all about sharing a bit of what I’ve learned from 3 years of blogging. (Actually 4 now since this is a re-blog.)

 

      1.     Fewer words.  So little time.

Many horse blog posts I’ve come across are simply too long.  Wordiness and endless blabber isn’t going to get much more than a click on the Back button.

Unless a post is documenting a very specific event, contains research, intricate discussion points etc.  (Forget this post – I’m already blowing it here by making it much too long.) it should be easy to keep it under 600 words.

Every time!

It will help readers actually make it through to the end.  Trust me on this one.

leading horse out from barn isle

     2.     Pictures.  Without them, no blog is truly alive.

Your posts need images that will anchor the text and the content, and offer a break for the eye.  Test your self when reading other articles etc.  Which ones do you find the easiest to read and follow?

Note how soon a picture will appear in the text, often very high up, and how a second image will make the post seem less “chunky” even if there are several sentences before and after it.

Experiment with your posts.  It’s a blog outlet, not a book 🙂

Close up picture of legs on cantering horse

     3.     Tag your images!

Google has a phantasmic way of sorting and organizing web content.  Take advantage of it!  All that’s needed:  correctly labeled pictures –  readers will find your content through images searches.  And find your blog, yay!

While there’s no proven way to make sure of a high rank in Google results, chances are upped by putting a tag on the picture.  If you don’t, Google will use the title of the image, which isn’t often as descriptive.

The more “unique” the content, the better chance of a higher search-rank result.

Your horse abscessed from a broken wine bottle opener, and you found the corkscrew poking out of the hoof wall?  Label the picture!

All bets are I’ll find it when I search for it.  Because that’s the sort of stuff that would happen to my horse!  And yep, you know I’d be up all night searching for a picture of it to see if this can actually happen…

"Elinor Yee"

     3 1/2.     Tagging posts.

Honorable mention for tagging the posts too.  From the WordPress articles I’ve read on this, depending on the content of the post anywhere between 3 to 10 tags is good.  11 we’re pushing it and the post may not even show up in the Reader.

Personally, since this is All Horse, All The Time, mine rarely go above 8.

 

     4.     Provide some space.  Avoid squashing everything together.

Many readers will come to your blog from a small phone, late at night, when the day is done and they don’t have the energy to read big blocks of text.  Again:  It’s a Horse Blog.

Sometimes posts are really good, but because they read like an essay, I just skim through the content.

Because they’re too long.  Too cluttered.  Too squished.

Couple of simple clicks on the space bar will make for easier breathing.  And reading.

Horse tail Horze Bridle Touluse Horze ear hood

5.     No need for Social Media Channel Overload.

How many channels do you absolutely need to post on to have a solid readership?

Your blog platform?  Facebook?  Twitter?  Pinterest?  Some other cross-posted platform?  Plus all the others…  Really?  Not sure I’ve bought this.

3 is OK.  Feel like you absolutely have to Tweet, Pin, flash on Insta, and schlep up on some other channels?  Fine.  Just know that it isn’t a requirement for having meaningful interaction with readers.

6.  Forget Diary Posts.  It’s so pre-2010.

Don’t have much to say today?  No need for a “just-because” post!  Also, no need for “catching-up” post content.  It often feels stressful to read, harried, egocentric, and irrelevant.

Everyone doesn’t have to read about everything that has happened.

That goes up on your Facebook feed instead!  And then friends can Unfollow you there.  True.

Elinor Yee

     7.    Be ready for the tone of posts to be misunderstood.  Roll with it.

Things will go wrong sometimes.  Or often.  English isn’t even my first language, so hey, there you go.

A focus on always creating flowy sentences or just the perfect intonation will pretty much kill off any creativity.  Too much pressure.

In the end, blogging will feel blocked.  And all those intentions to post will wane.  Some days, just post and be happy!

 

     8.     Cuss words may not be necessary.  Unless you’re incredibly funny.

This blog hasn’t been that funny yet.

Cantering without stirrups on white arabian

     9.  Write for yourself, not to please any particular reader.

Having a narrow niche blog is great.  And if you’re here, yours is probably about horses.  That doesn’t mean you have to appeal to a specific person(s).  Just something to keep in mind…

 

     10.     Count on possibly getting completely picked apart.

Picked apart is usually constructive.  Appreciate it!

On the other hand, getting attacked can only mean two things.  Either it’s from some troll, who should be ignored.  Or, your content is simply painful/neglectful/dumb-bottle-necked for the horses.

Post stuff like that and be ready to be eaten up.  And definitely Unfollowed.  I’ve avoided this category so far.

And trolling myself is not high on my “Let’s-make-time-for-this-today” list.  The Unfollow is much easier.

Elinor Yee Leading horse

As always, I’d love to hear your comments on this!

 Stop by tomorrow for the next 10 Tips!

Dressage On A Dime A Horse For Elinor

Horse Blog Do’s & Don’ts Part 2

Here’s the next 10 blogging tips for a reader friendly blog!

Yesterday’s Part 1 was a huge hit!  As promised, today we’re doing tips #11 through 20.

Dressage On A Dime A Horse For Elinor

Before we get in to it – remember to have fun with your blog!  There’s really no true rules.  As always, I’d love to hear what you have to say at the end!  Share your own tips and pet peeves!

 

11.     Consider the content in any picture before posting.

Readers will have a hard time seeing a quick image as something fleeting or temporary, or as something unusual.

If you choose to post pictures of your horse, let’s say lathered and with a rope halter rubbing off its outside eye on the lunge line, then yes, viewers will see this as a true representation of how your horses are normally handled.

Even if it was just one time.  For 5 minutes.

Just that it was published on your blog draws a parallel, and sets a precedence.

Getting off track here…  As you can tell below, I check every picture before posting to make sure everything is correct and in place…

candid picture gone wrong

     12.    Ignore the statistics for now.

Hits of 2000 per month is insignificant, and won’t pull in any money.  Just write anyway, have fun with it, and think of the reasons the blog started in the first place!

A way to document?  An adventure?  A chance to create a network of like-minded that could never happen in real life…  Because we’re always too busy waiting for the farrier.  Or run out of time cleaning tack, or fixing the broken hay net, again.

 

     13.    Spell check.

‘Nuff said.  No grammar police, but a spell check is nice.  I butcher sentences in my own special way and reverse the words to where the syntax is broken.  More or less on purpose perhaps.

But a spell check is easy, and readers really do like it.

The easy part is pushing the square with ABC and a check mark, every time.  Yes?

Benefits of hand Walking Young horses on trails

     14.     Imaging is king.  (That’s not even a sentence, I’m lost.)

See 11 above – pictures mean a lot.  Include a photo in every post.

We know content is king, but the eye is a cheat and an easy sell and will stay longer on a page with a picture.

Posts with no images get very little views.  It’s simply how it works.  You can read all sorts of marketing studies on this.  Or just go with it – and break up those chunks of text.

Honorable mention:

Aim to use only your own images for at least 90% of all pictures on the blog.  It makes a difference – the material should always feel as if it comes from you.

Hand walking green horse on trail

     15.    Page Backgrounds.  Just.  Don’t.  Do it.

It should be illegal for themes with purple and pink paisley to even exist as an option.

No one does this any more.  Right?!

 

     16.     Once-weekly posting may be enough.

Supposedly webcrawlers look for fresh content and it will help in search ratings if the website has been updated.  If your site has new content, it will pop up higher/earlier in search engines.  That’s all.

Excessive posting doesn’t really do anything.  This blog is published more often, just because I like it…  More posts doesn’t always equal more reader-worthy posts.

Cantering green horse

     17.     Answer comments on the blog.  At some point.

I’m always incredibly grateful for reader comments.  It’s fun, I love to interact, hear what others are doing and find out what they think about the post!

But there’s not law that says a writer has to be a slave to commenting right away.  Many of us have an incredible long list of things that has to happen every day.  (We’re horse people!)  Taking time to write is huge.

Every one will understand if comments are unanswered for a couple of days.  The less stress around anything with your writing, the more fun!

 

     18.     Quit it with the pop ups.

Unless it’s a cheesy self-help site.  Or a scam.  Or a virus.  It feels a bit like click-bait…

Most of us are snake-fast with the “Back” button!

     19.     Focus on “Ease Of Use” for your readers.

The blog should be easy to read, access, and navigate!  There are blogs where readers have to “click for more” to be able to read the entire post.  Really?  Come on!  Many won’t click…

Don’t sacrifice ease of use just to get more page clicks and increased statistics on a page that doesn’t bring in any money in the first place.  More “views” don’t make a difference in the larger scheme of things.

Readers will stay longer instead if the full post can be read upfront, and why not allow several, earlier, posts below it?

Maybe infinite scrolling of 5-10 posts?  Sure, statistics will show more views if readers are forced to “click-through” to see each individual post.

But why??!  I’d love to hear your feedback on this.  Hit me!

cantering green horse and half halt

     20.    Reviews, and how they may, or may not generate more followers.

Write reviews because they’re fun and because you enjoy writing them.  My posts with the largest statistics and the longest shelf life are all reviews.  (Aside from a post with a tag Mount A Horse which keeps getting high hits, Germany every time.  So wrong.)

The same goes for some shared posts and certain content found through Online Searches – they generate hits, but not necessarily new Followers.

Many come for the content, read, and move on.  A view from Pinterest means just that – a view.

Just what everyone does when getting information, right?  We don’t always take time to click-through past the article to find out who wrote it, what else is going on this site, and decide to Follow, Share, Like, Pin, or Forward it.

This doesn’t really change anything in the actual writing of the blog.  Just more something to keep in mind – a blog can sit with lower followers and still have a huge reach.

"Elinor Yee"

Enjoyed the tips?  Chime in! 

Help your friends out and share your thoughts.  Of course I’m all ears for your ideas to help make this blog easier to read.

Dressage On A Dime A Horse For Elinor

Horse Blog Do’s & Don’ts, Part 1

10 and 1/2 Quick tips on how to make blog posts that readers will take the time to read.

There’s some fantastic content out there, in all those blogs, some is really well worth a read!

But much of it doesn’t actually.  You know.  Get read.

Dressage On A Dime A Horse For Elinor

None of us are expert blog marketing gurus.  Let’s face it – we’d rather be in the saddle than reading up on mysterious ways to increase readership traffic on our little side-kick horse blogs.

Since we’re all in this together – today is all about sharing a bit of what I’ve learned from 3 years of blogging.

 

      1.     Fewer words.  So little time.

Many horse blog posts I’ve come across are simply too long.  Wordiness and endless blabber isn’t going to get much more than a click on the Back button.

Unless a post is documenting a very specific event, contains research, intricate discussion points etc.  (Forget this post – I’m already blowing it here by making it much too long.) it should be easy to keep it under 600 words.

Every time!

It will help readers actually make it through to the end.  Trust me on this one.

leading horse out from barn isle

     2.     Pictures.  Without them, no blog is truly alive.

Your posts need images that will anchor the text and the content, and offer a break for the eye.  Test your self when reading other articles etc.  Which ones do you find the easiest to read and follow?

Note how soon a picture will appear in the text, often very high up, and how a second image will make the post seem less “chunky” even if there are several sentences before and after it.

Experiment with your posts.  Its a blog outlet, not a book 🙂

Close up picture of legs on cantering horse

     3.     Tag your images!

Google has a phantasmic way of sorting and organizing web content.  Take advantage of it!  All that’s needed:  correctly labeled pictures –  readers will find your content through images searches.  And find your blog, yay!

While there’s no proven way to make sure of a high rank in Google results, chances are upped by putting a tag on the picture.  If you don’t, Google will use the title of the image, which isn’t often as descriptive.

The more “unique” the content, the better chance of a higher search-rank result.

Your horse abscessed from a broken wine bottle opener, and you found the corkscrew poking out of the hoof wall?  Label the picture!

All bets are I’ll find it when I search for it.  Because that’s the sort of stuff that would happen to my horse!  And yep, you know I’d be up all night searching for a picture of it to see if this can actually happen…

"Elinor Yee"

     3 1/2.     Tagging posts.

Honorable mention for tagging the posts too.  From the WordPress articles I’ve read on this, depending on the content of the post anywhere between 3 to 10 tags is good.  11 we’re pushing it and the post may not even show up in the Reader.

Personally, since this is All Horse, All The Time, mine rarely go above 8.

 

     4.     Provide some space.  Avoid squashing everything together.

Many readers will come to your blog from a small phone, late at night, when the day is done and they don’t have the energy to read big blocks of text.  Again:  It’s a Horse Blog.

Sometimes posts are really good, but because they read like an essay, I just skim through the content.

Because they’re too long.  Too cluttered.  Too squished.

Couple of simple clicks on the space bar will make for easier breathing.  And reading.

Horse tail Horze Bridle Touluse Horze ear hood

5.     No need for Social Media Channel Overload.

How many channels do you absolutely need to post on to have a solid readership?

Your blog platform?  Facebook?  Twitter?  Pinterest?  Some other cross-posted platform?  Plus all the others…  Really?  Not sure I’ve bought this.

3 is OK.  Feel like you absolutely have to Tweet, Pin, flash on Insta, and schlep up on some other channels?  Fine.  Just know that it isn’t a requirement for having meaningful interaction with readers.

6.  Forget Diary Posts.  It’s so pre-2010.

Don’t have much to say today?  No need for a “just-because” post!  Also, no need for “catching-up” post content.  It often feels stressful to read, harried, egocentric, and irrelevant.

Everyone doesn’t have to read about everything that has happened.

That goes up on your Facebook feed instead!  And then friends can Unfollow you there.  True.

Elinor Yee

     7.    Be ready for the tone of posts to be misunderstood.  Roll with it.

Things will go wrong sometimes.  Or often.  English isn’t even my first language, so hey, there you go.

A focus on always creating flowy sentences or just the perfect intonation will pretty much kill off any creativity.  Too much pressure.

In the end, blogging will feel blocked.  And all those intentions to post will wane.  Some days, just post and be happy!

 

     8.     Cuss words may not be necessary.  Unless you’re incredibly funny.

This blog hasn’t been that funny yet.

Cantering without stirrups on white arabian

     9.  Write for yourself, not to please any particular reader.

Having a narrow niche blog is great.  And if you’re here, yours is probably about horses.  That doesn’t mean you have to appeal to a specific person(s).  Just something to keep in mind…

 

     10.     Count on possibly getting completely picked apart.

Picked apart is usually constructive.  Appreciate it!

On the other hand, getting attacked can only mean two things.  Either it’s from some troll, who should be ignored.  Or, your content is simply painful/neglectful/dumb-bottle-necked for the horses.

Post stuff like that and be ready to be eaten up.  And definitely Unfollowed.  I’ve avoided this category so far.

And trolling myself is not high on my “Let’s-make-time-for-this-today” list.  The Unfollow is much easier.

Elinor Yee Leading horse

As always, I’d love to hear your comments on this!

 Stop by tomorrow for the next 10 Tips!

Dressage On A Dime A Horse For Elinor

What readers search for when finding your blog

Search Terms…

Sometimes very interesting ones will pop up in the Dashboard.

The number one thing so far this year was Remission.  Must be an awful lot of horse owners concerned with founder or laminitis with their horses – this article keeps popping up in searches again and again.  If you feel the urge to read it, too, you can find it here: Remission.

In no particular order, here are the top ones for the past 3months on this blog:

horse unflattering

Yep, a lot of pictures of those here.

copd from riding in dusty arena

It can happen.  Last summer was rough, before we got the sprinklers going in the arena.

mane braiders association

Nope, not a member of that one.

nesting box curtains

They work great!  These were mine:

Nesting box chandelierThe rest of the post is HERE.

cut in fetlock of a horse

Hate when that happens!  They seem intent on banging themselves up at all times.  Cooper healed up well.

do chickens need a dim night light?

No, but it looks so much cuter right?

Night Lights in Coop

i am a horse in 2014 what does it mean

That you’re soon getting very spooky.

sulcus crumble and soft horse

Now you’re really getting a problem.

does remission treat ulcers in horses

No, Remission can do many things, but ulcers will really only respond to a full-fledged Omeprazole treatment.

horse making noise

An ongoing problem, the various noises they constantly seem to make, isn’t it?

are buff orpingtons paler when young

Yes, that’s how you can tell whether you’re buying a pullet, or some old hen that is nearing the end of her egg laying days.  Young Orpington:

Chicken On!

would magnesium make horse gassy

Suppose that is possible.  Anything seems to make them gassy, really.

how much is a dime

10 Cents.  That’s all I’ll put in.

slimy leather horse

Hate that, too!  If it’s the leather tack, it’s usually from overly humid air, and/or overconditioning.

bridles rubbing grey horses

Time for some tack shopping!  (Always good news, when it’s time for tack shopping!)

horses being slaughtered while awake

Yeah, you won’t find that on my page…

can i use sugar cubes to encourage my horse forward

I haven’t really seen it work.  They do love to get rewards, but I don’t think it makes them more in front of the leg at all…

how to fill in swampy barn area

Drainage ditches!  Peat gravel or DG perhaps.

scrapes on horses

They always seem to get them, don’t they?

nice pictures to share

Now you’re just really pulling an allnighter and looking for meaningless stuff to post on FaceBook that is boring your “friends” to death.  But yes, there are tons of nice pictures to share on this blog!

salt blocks taste good

Agreed.  I’ve tasted it too.  The Rocks from Utah are the best.

pasturing emu

This is a horse blog.

synovial fluid and turnout in horses

Yes!  This!

older dressage riders

Eh, OK then – admitting to being a senior rider very soon.

loading a horse with lunge line

Not usually a good idea.  HUGE accidents CAN and WILL happen.  But yes, I’ve done it in the past.

how to clean cob webs out of an old barn

With great difficulty, and no one will really thank you for it.

Nevertakeanyoneseriously

growing a horse’s tail curse

Yes it is a curse!  But it can be done, with some care.

Growing tail

how to makea stick to measure a horse

I made This One. Well, it’s alright, and cheap.

horses as christmas gifts 2014

Not usually a good idea.  And if you search on Youtube  you’ll just find yourself sniffling when all those little girls finally get their ponies.

ugly riding horse

What!  No!

green horse canter sudden

Yes.  They do that.  Buckingstrap is good.

ringworm in horses at beginning

Usually like a small, tiny perfect circle with crusty skin.

rib smoothies

There really IS such a thing?

horses+tail+falling+out+at+roots

Major problem.  Multiple causes.  Act right away.

can a horse with contracted heels stumble a lot

Suppose so.  Contracted heels really hurt.

And the 2nd to very top search result:

disillusioned with horse’s dressage

I’m with you on that one.  We all are…